Flow

EDS 103:

Answers to  FLOW Activity

  1. Two variables, challenge level & skill level, as represented on the vertical and horizonatal axes of the chart, determine our motivational response to a learning experience.
  2. When challenge is (column 1) and Skill is (column 2), the learner’s response to a learning experience is (column 3).

 

Challenge Skill Motivational Response
Low Low Apathy
Low Moderate Boredom
Low High  Relaxation
Moderate Low Worry
Moderate High  Control
High Low Anxiety
High Moderate Arousal
High High  Flow

3. Thus, in conlusion, flow happens when the situation presents a high level challenge as perceived by the engager/learner that matches his talents and skills at his best. It provides the person a deep sense of gratification, sense of achievement and fulfillment for performing and accomplishing the goals he has set for himself.

As a visual learner, I find myself doodling and drawing even in class during my younger elementary years. At first I perceived this as lack of interest in class. Thanks to theories of learning and Howard Gardner, I have discovered I am perfectly normal.smile Growing up, I have learned to incorporate my drawings in my learning process. I was able to use symbols,doodles to represent key words and principles, making them easier to recall. In highschool,I would spend hours painting subjects and doing posters that interest me, barely noticing hunger until taking the time off to rest. At the university level, I have found anatomy and physiology subjects very interesting maybe because I find the human body design truly amazing. And perhaps because it gave me again wonderful opportunity to work with visuals.  I would draw human parts to remember them. The thing is, I think I had spent so much time drawing, learning in this subject area as compared to the other subjects.

smile

Module 2 e-journal entry: Know Your Learning Style

What’s Your Learning Style? The Results

Your Scores:

  • Auditory: 30%
  • Visual: 55%
  • Tactile: 15%

Learning Styles Results


Results for: Mark AciertoACT              X                                    REF 

11  9   7   5   3   1   1   3   5   7   9   11

<– –>

SEN                  X                                INT

11  9   7   5   3   1   1   3   5   7   9   11

<– –>

VIS  X                                                VRB

11  9   7   5   3   1   1   3   5   7   9   11

<– –>

SEQ                                  X                GLO

11  9   7   5   3   1   1   3   5   7   9   11

<– –>

 

This is wonderful!

I have tried some of the learning style surveys just for kicks (What’s your learning style? By education planner.org & Index of learning styles questionnaires by Barbara Solomon, et.al )  and I have reaffirmed that I am a visual learner. I never thought though that my being a visual learner was that strong until I tried answering the questionnaires in the index of learning styles which indicated 11, the highest level.  I have always known that I appreciate pictures more than words as a child. I can still remember how my notebooks were filled with my scribbles and drawings that captured my interests. As a kid, I used to draw a variety of things  from cars, animals, stick people and landscapes.  I remember doing my own comic strips too.

In college, I remember that my ability to draw helped me a lot in my subjects such as anatomy and physiology.  My illustrations were always fresh in my mind as compared to the plain facts I needed to memorize for recall purposes.

I find it really entertaining to learn more nowadays because of the availability of the various multi-media materials that appeal to our senses.  In the past when computer technology was not that highly developed yet, a person’s best friend was the library. Hmm, I think I am exposing my age too much here.  Perhaps techno savvy citizens here might find that statement difficult to relate to. For to them the word library may be just synonymous to personal sleeping space.  I wonder if young people still go to the library for research. Today, everything you need to know is just a click away.

I have further realized through the survey that I am a global learner.  I like to approach things in a macro perspective first; looking at the bigger picture before going into the details.  It helps me rationalize my action plan on how to approach the process of learning.  When reading a book, I tend to scan the table of contents first.  At times, I even try to read the last part first before I actually indulge in reading it from the beginning. Does that make me weird or something?   But that’s just the way it works for me.

There is an old cliché that goes “different strokes for different folks”.  Or is it the other way around? We all have different learning styles. And as teachers or would be teachers, I believe that it is very important to understand that our students also have their own preference in terms of learning which makes them effective.  It is important that we acknowledge and respect that.  Knowing our students’ learning styles makes us more equipped and effective teachers.

Sources:

Index of Learning Style Questionnaire.http://www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb.html

Education Planner.Org. http://www.educationplanner.org/students/self-assessments/learning-styles-quiz.shtml?event=results&A=6&V=11&T=3

Learning and Maturation

EDS103: Learning and maturation

  1. 1.     What events constitute learning and what events do not? As a learner yourself, what are your ideas about learning?

 

According to schunk (2012), is an enduring change in behavior, or in the capacity to behave in a given fashion, which results from practice or other forms of experience.

 

Furthermore, the author  says that the following constitute learning:

  • Change
  • Endurance over time
  • Consequence of experience

 

Learning is personal change in behavior and cannot be forced to anyone. Biological changes brought about maturity, although considered as lasting change over time, cannot constitute learning.

 

For me, learning is the acquisition of knowledge and skills to be able to perform specific tasks necessary to accomplish set of goals. It could take place anywhere and anytime whether formally or informally throughout life. In fact many times it has been said that life is a continuous learning process and that the only time we stop learning is when we cease to live.

  1. 2.      Look up the difference between maturation and learning and the role of maturation in learning.  Why should teachers be aware about the relationship between maturation and learning?  Cite personal experiences or observations where the learning processes are impaired when the teacher/s fail to value this relationship.

 

Maturation refers to the sequential biological growth and development of an individual.(Huitt)  It takes place beyond our control – brain development and growth of body parts are some of the examples.  Learning on the other hand is acquired through our daily experiences from the environment that permanently changes our behavior.

 

Maturation and learning are said to be interrelated.  The learning ability of a child follows his maturation and consequent development Yes.  As the child grows from infancy to toddler to becoming a pre-schooler, so does his cognitive and psychomotor abilities. The child learns to perform new things and tasks as he accumulates knowledge.

 

According to Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, children move through four different mental development. His chart shows the relationship of maturation and children’s learning ability (see linked site for chart). YesYesYes

 
Teachers must be aware of every learner’s age and maturity for him to be able to design appropriate activities for them (children/learner).  Selecting and providing the right activities engages the child and increases the chances of  knowledge acquisition.  The developmental milestones may also serve as a checklist for teachers when assessing their students’ abilities; whether they are progressing or lagging behind vis-à-vis the learner’s chronological age and maturity.

 

Learning is impaired when a teacher/parent/care giver of a child forces the learner to perform tasks that is not age appropriate. For example, forcing a two year old child write legibly on a piece of paper even before the child has developed his fine motor skills for writing; finger grip and the muscles of the hand have yet to be ready.  This  leads to frustration of both the child learner and the teacher who is highly expecting of the child’s performance.

 

Children are intelligent like their adult counterparts but they have different ways of learning (Piaget).  It is important that activities provided to them are those that suit their skills and abilities to ensure an effective learning process.

 

 

Sources:

 

Conditions of Learning. http://www.instructionaldesign.org/theories/conditions-learning.html

An Overview of Piaget’s Stages of Cognitive Development. http://psychology.about.com/od/behavioralpsychology/l/bl-piaget-stages.htm

 

Piaget’s Stages of Development: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/piagets-stages-of-development.html

( Evidently enriched by readings beyond the module.  Well artiuclated. [T. Malou] Marilou Juachon – original submission Wednesday, 15 May 2013, 09:35 PM)

Average of ratings: ☆☆☆☆- (1)

 

Teaching

EDS103: On Teaching What is Huitt’s (2011) view about the function of teaching? Huitt  views teaching as a purposeful direction and management of the learning process. It is not giving knowledge or skills to students; it is a process of providing guided opportunities for students to produce relatively permanent change through the engagement in experiences provided by the teacher. Do you agree that “teaching is not giving knowledge or skills to students”? How does his view differ from your own? I agree. The purpose of teaching is not simply to train a learner acquire knowledge and skill. I believe that it is deeper than that. To teach is to educate.  Teaching should stimulate a child to thirst for knowledge and motivate him to find meaning and purpose for what one does. Teaching is educating learners how to think critically by showing them how to come up with relevant questions that lead students to finding answers. How will teachers who share his view that “teaching is the process of providing guided opportunities for students “ do things differently from those who believe that teaching is “giving knowledge or skills to students”? I believe that teachers who share Huitt’s view will have a different approach in making their students’ learn. Instead of just providing them (students) facts and information on the subject area that they need to learn, teachers will instead engage their students’ higher order  thinking skills and lead them to formulate their own conclusions about their topic. The teacher will follow the lead of the child, starting at the child’s cognitive level and help that child build his own concepts by providing him, for example, relevant questions, until the learner arrives to answers and has fully understood the subject matter. On the other hand, ordinary teachers would simply state, enumerate facts and tell the learners the “what” to learn and more often than not miss the “whys and Hows” of learning.

Higher Order Thinkers

I believe that more than just teaching students about factual information at school, it is the teachers’ responsibility to provoke critical thinking specially for those who are teaching History, Aralin Panlipunan,Noli, El Fili, Economics, Life and works of Jose Rizal and the likes . It is more important that the students learn how to think productively rather than just accept whatever is fed to him/her.

A good teacher welcomes challenging questions and tries his best to answer them. But in the event that  he does not know the answer, he does not pretend to know nor attempts to give an information that may be misleading to the learners. He however, encourages everyone to seek for answers with him. As teachers though, it is expected that we are always ahead of our learners.

I have met some wonderful teachers in during my formal schooling years. I may have forgotten the exact topics we have talked about at school but I definitely remember how they made an impact in the way I learn about things.

Let us teach children not just what to learn but how and why they should learn.

Module 1 e-journal entry: Metacognition and Self-regulation

Metacognition and Self-regulation

  1.   What is metacognition? 

Metacognition  is   the awareness and understanding of  one’s thinking and cognitive processes; thinking about thinking (Dictionary.com’s 21st Century Lexicon)

It is a deeper understanding of our own unique learning process.

 (a) Discuss how the following beliefs deter learning.
(b) Describe beliefs that contrast with each
and how such can enhance learning:

According to Dr.Steven Chew of Samford University, the following are beliefs that make us fail as learners:

  • Learning is fast

True learning requires deep processing (elaboration of concepts, distinctiveness, personal relation to experience and application) and takes time. Memorizing and just merely going through the bits and pieces of information only entail shallow processing.

  • Knowledge is composed of isolated facts

Shallow processing only involves isolated facts that are, most of the time, merely memorized pieces of information. Isolated facts become meaningless if they are not coherently tied together by concepts and prior knowledge.  Knowledge requires deeper learning and understanding, comprehension and meaningful connections.

  • Intelligence is an inborn trait

I believe that some people are gifted, born with extraordinary intelligence. They are able to learn faster than others. They have the ability to think and process information and assimilate in a very short time. That is why some are said to have photographic memories.

However, I think that intelligence is not static. It is not a case of either you have it or not. It is both nature and nurture. All of us are born with a degree of intelligence, perhaps some are just better than others but it does not mean that we cannot learn. To me, the only difference between a person with superb Intelligence Quotient and an average learner (ave.IQ) is time. The former can learn a material, perhaps, in single reading in about thirty minutes. While the later average person still be able to learn the same material, perhaps, by reading and re-reading and taking notes in about forty-five or more minutes. Bottom line is that they both are able to learn and have intelligence. The only difference is their time to learn.

Intelligence therefore can be improved, developed and nurtured.

  • “I’m really good at multi-tasking”

According to Dr. Chew, we are not designed to multi-task.  However, many times we make ourselves believe that we can do several things at the same time. Truth to this is that we are able to do it at the expense of the other task we have to perform such as concentrating or focusing on learning.

To illustrate this, I think multi-tasking is like trying to look at things all at the same time  through a single lens. For those who are into photography, we all know that focusing on a subject well (sharper photos) makes the rest of the objects around it look out of focus or blurry (depth of field)

2.    What is self-regulation? Why is self-regulation (critically) important in distance education?

Self-regulation  to my understanding is having the discipline to learn in the best way one can by taking into consideration the topics, concepts, including time frame available to the learner. It is effectively monitoring one’s personal progress vis-à-vis his set learning goals and objectives.

This is critically important to DE because the program requires you to accomplish set of learning goals and objectives in a time frame. One has to manage his resources including time to meet the learning demands.

3.    How shall I study to optimize learning in this course?

I think the greatest challenge here is managing one’s time. And again, as I have learned in the previous readings, this requires discipline.  The program and the FIC though have efficiently laid down set the learning parameters by providing schedules, course outline, materials to read  and guidelines on how one’s learning will be measured. Utilizing all this information will be necessary to optimize learning.

I think that I am a visual learner and as such I enjoy learning while watching. During my clinical years in dentistry we engage a learning process called – Tell, show, do, which is like learning through mentoring. In the case of DE I believe that this still can be done by watching videos online.

4.    In what ways will keeping a learning journal help me learn better?

Keeping a learning journal enables me to track my progress. It gives DE learners like myself  keep my learning pace vis-à-vis the time given to me by the program. The journal can, in some ways, serve as a checklist for things accomplished, thoughts and insights about what I have learned, even including the list of materials I have consulted. It can also serve as my personal notes and  contain my visual maps about the deep learning processes I have experienced through the various assigned readings.

Sources:

Eidetic Memory. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eidetic_memory

Recall. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recall_(memory)

Metacognition for Self-Regulated Learning in a Dynamic Environment. http://www.cs.umd.edu/~darsana/papers/SASO-09.pdf

On Learning and Maturation

  1. 1.     What events constitute learning and what events do not? As a learner yourself, what are your ideas about learning?

According to schunk (2012), is an enduring change in behavior, or in the capacity to behave in a given fashion, which results from practice or other forms of experience.

Furthermore, the author  says that the following constitute learning:

  • Change
  • Endurance over time
  • Consequence of experience

Learning is personal change in behavior and cannot be forced to anyone. Biological changes brought about maturity, although considered as lasting change over time, cannot constitute learning.

For me, learning is the acquisition of knowledge and skills to be able to perform specific tasks necessary to accomplish set of goals. It could take place anywhere and anytime whether formally or informally throughout life. In fact many times it has been said that life is a continuous learning process and that the only time we stop learning is when we cease to live.

  1. 2.      Look up the difference between maturation and learning and the role of maturation in learning.  Why should teachers be aware about the relationship between maturation and learning?  Cite personal experiences or observations where the learning processes are impaired when the teacher/s fail to value this relationship.

Maturation refers to the sequential biological growth and development of an individual.(Huitt)  It takes place beyond our control – brain development and growth of body parts are some of the examples.  Learning on the other hand is acquired through our daily experiences from the environment that permanently changes our behavior.

Maturation and learning are said to be interrelated.  The learning ability of a child follows his maturation and consequent development.  As the child grows from infancy to toddler to becoming a pre-schooler, so does his cognitive and psychomotor abilities. The child learns to perform new things and tasks as he accumulates knowledge.

According to Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, children move through four different mental development. His chart shows the relationship of maturation and children’s learning ability (see linked site for chart).
Teachers must be aware of every learner’s age and maturity for him to be able to design appropriate activities for them (children/learner).  Selecting and providing the right activities engages the child and increases the chances of  knowledge acquisition.  The developmental milestones may also serve as a checklist for teachers when assessing their students’ abilities; whether they are progressing or lagging behind vis-à-vis the learner’s chronological age and maturity.

Learning is impaired when a teacher/parent/care giver of a child forces the learner to perform tasks that is not age appropriate. For example, forcing a two year old child write legibly on a piece of paper even before the child has developed his fine motor skills for writing; finger grip and the muscles of the hand have yet to be ready.  This  leads to frustration of both the child learner and the teacher who is highly expecting of the child’s performance.

Children are intelligent like their adult counterparts but they have different ways of learning (Piaget).  It is important that activities provided to them are those that suit their skills and abilities to ensure an effective learning process.

Sources:

Conditions of Learning. http://www.instructionaldesign.org/theories/conditions-learning.html

An Overview of Piaget’s Stages of Cognitive Development. http://psychology.about.com/od/behavioralpsychology/l/bl-piaget-stages.htm

Piaget’s Stages of Development: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/piagets-stages-of-development.html